Art Week Berlin Berlin Art Week – Impressions review

From September 13th to September 18th the Berlin Art week took place. Berlin was packed with more than 100.000 art lovers and enthusiasts that were able to discover new contemporary art, influences and perceive what motivates artists nowadays thanks to more than 50 galleries who opened the doors to the public.
The Berlin Art week is a great event where Berlin has the chance to celebrate itself as an artistic city with a poetic soul. Museums, galleries, private collectors and artists show their work to the audience with a bounty of exhibitions, events and fairs. For six whole days you can experience the city in a different way.
We on Artig Gallery were thrilled to be part of this event and share with you some of the highlights of this fifth berlin art week filled with inspiration, trends and contemporary art pieces.


Artwork1

Taisuke Mohri
The mirror 2
Pencil on paper

This hyperrealistic pencil drawing, was one of the most amazing pieces shown from the Japanese artist. In this piece “The Mirror 2”, two contradictory mechanisms work together; an open window where the girl can be seen, while at the same time closing the image with a structure of mirrors. The hyperrealism technique of this artist goes beyond the mimetic techniques and push the viewer into the image of the mirror that creates. On the one hand, the repetition functions of the window on the mirrow and on the other, the onlooker that are not supposed to meet. This is a contradictory paradox that multiplies the scene while eliminating the reality, making of this such a strong, penetrating drawing.

Rifles

André Robillard
Rifles
Sculpture

André Robillard grew up near Orléans, France. At the age of 19, as a result of mental disturbances, André Robillard was committed to the hospital in Fleury-les-Aubrais, near Orléans. There he carried out various tasks, while also having a part-time jobs. Thanks to this, he was able to have his own space at the institution where he stored guns, spaceships and sputniks that he has made since 1964 from objects he salvaged from the rubbish tip, such as food tins, old lightbulbs, pieces of wood, plastic piping and metal bars. He assembled these diverse elements with adhesive tape and iron wire.
Robillard's guns are detailed replicas of actual firearms, inspired by the images of real rifles and submarine guns, which he took from books and magazines. He re-contextualizes familiar materials, giving them a new meaning by placing them in an unintended setting. Not surprisingly, his assembled weapons have something rebellious but sinister. This is the general ambiguity that pervades Robillard's work: while his fascination for guns goes back to his childhood memories of quality time spend with his father hunting, the gun in itself can still kill. It is clear that there is no such thing as innocent junk.

Frankfurt

Erwin Wurm
Abstract Sculpture
Bronze

The dissonant humour and beauty of his sculptures is what cached our attention when seeing this series of sausage-like forms misshaped into bronze sculptures that evoke anthropomorphic physical qualities and movements. Due to the familiarity of the daily food known as “Frankfurt” but putted into unexpected contexts that challenge our perception of the reality, these works are both familiar yet strange and evoke pause and contemplation anywhere they are.

Emoji

Despina Stokou
Feminism & machismo light
Charcoal, chal, and collage on linen


Emojis have become part of our day to day communication. These symbols are used as part of an universal language and different types of communication that the Greek artists tries to represent in her artwork.
In this special piece, she repeated one single emoji,on which she explain us:

“I really like the Spanish dancer emoji for example, I made a few pieces with it called “feminism (light)”. When I thought of doing the male counterpart (machismo light) I chose the cactus emoji. In popular culture aubergine is supposed to represent the penis"

The artist created an interesting semiotic system portrayed in her art, defining digital communication as a new form of expression.